DIRTY WORK, Stuart Woods

DIRTY WORK, Stuart Woods

Unreservedly. the best Stone Barrington book Stuart Woods has written. It has it all, suspense, intrigue, tension, excitement, murder and mayhem. Everything.

Synopsis
Hired to prove infidelity in an heiress’s marriage, Stone Barrington goes undercover. But the work turns dirty-and catastrophic-when the errant husband is found dead and the other woman disappears without a trace. Now, Stone must clear his own good name and find a killer hiding among the glitterati of New York’s high society. Enter Carpenter-the beautiful British intelligence agent first encountered in The Short Forever-who has arrived in New York to begin an investigation of her own. Stone suspects that her case is strangely connected to the dead husband. And he and Dino, his former NYPD partner, are set to face the most bizarre and challenging assignment of their very colourful careers.

Richard says
Without a doubt, this book is Stuart Woods at his best. Only one of his books surpasses this one, Chiefs, but that work was his 10 years in the making opus.

Dirty Work almost channels James Bond with a plot where a professional assassin in cause mayhem and murder in New York City and Stone and his sleuthing teammate, Lieutenant Bachetti work to find her.

Vivid detail, frenetic excitement and suspense descriptions make this book not only a good read but an entertaining one.

Of course, Woods modus operandi includes the usual gamut of  New York City’s finest eateries, all real, many still serving. Elaine’s, the chief one with owner/hostess Elaine playing a pivotal role in this story, sadly is no longer open.

Our villain in this story, La Biche, is so well trained as an assassin, she can give James Bond a run for his money. Intelligent, a master of accents, and amazingly adept in the field, she stays one step ahead of the NYPD and Stone in their maddening pursuit.

This book will have every reader reading from the edge of their seat and turning pages till the wee hours of the morning. It really is that kind of read.

 

 

 

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