RICHARD reads reviews: BARELY LEGAL, Stuart Woods

Co-authored books are usually poor reads as the more well-known author has likely passed the real writing of the story over to the subordinate writer. Tom Clancy has likely not actually authored his own stories for many years. Lee Child has taken on the practice. Baldacci and Grisham are likely not far behind.

Stuart Woods’ first novel, Chiefs, without reservation, was his best. An outstanding story written in the style of Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird. It took ten years to write the story and the wait was worth it.

Barely legal‘mehh!’

The synopsis
Under the tutelage of Stone Barrington, Herbie Fisher has transformed from a bumbling sad sack into the youngest partner at the white-shoe law firm Woodman & Weld, and a man whose company is in high demand both because of his professional acumen and his savoir faire. But even his newly won composure and finely honed skills can’t prepare him for the strange escapade he’s unwittingly pulled into, and which–unbeknownst to him–has put him at the center of a bull’s-eye. In the city that never sleeps there are always devious schemes afoot, and Herbie will have to be quick on his feet to stay one step ahead of his enemies…and they’re closing in.

Richard’s view
Unfortunately, co-authorship does not double the chances of a novel’s success. Usually, the better known author relinquishes the writer control to the lesser known author. The lesser known may not have the skills, experience or professional history to become the backbone of the writing.

Barely Legal, though one cannot discern who has written which aspect of the book, who has made what contribution, but one can recognize the cohesion, tightness and unity of the story is tenuous.

The plot may be the weakest link here. It’s a straightforward story of organized crime intimidating authorities and influencing civil and judicial processes. The strenth of the book comes in the dialogue, authentic sounding, poignant and blunt, it sounds as if it could come out of the mouths of the characters of the book in real life.

In short
If you like Mickey Spillane novels, the genre of the 1940’s and 1950’s detective stories with brash protagonists who talk in blurts and spits, then this is your story. If you like the atmosphere of that era with its thugs business suits bulging at the hip because of a gun, cliched, old movie-ish, this is your book.

It’s a comic book with dialogue and not up to snuff!

This entry was posted in RICHARD reads reviews. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.