The JUDGE’S LIST, John Grisham

grisham

One can never go wrong reading any John Grisham book. This applies here, no less, and its damned by faint praise. This is an entertaining and engaging read: FULL STOP.


Synopsis
In The Whistler, Lacy Stoltz investigated a corrupt judge who was taking millions in bribes from a crime syndicate. She put the criminals away, but only after being attacked and nearly killed. Three years later, and approaching forty, she is tired of her work for the Florida Board on Judicial Conduct and ready for a change.

Then she meets a mysterious woman who is so frightened she uses a number of aliases. Jeri Crosby’s father was murdered twenty years earlier in a case that remains unsolved and that has grown stone cold. But Jeri has a suspect whom she has become obsessed with and has stalked for two decades. Along the way, she has discovered other victims.

Suspicions are easy enough, but proof seems impossible. The man is brilliant, patient, and always one step ahead of law enforcement. He is the most cunning of all serial killers. He knows forensics, police procedure, and most important: he knows the law.

He is a judge, in Florida—under Lacy’s jurisdiction.

He has a list, with the names of his victims and targets, all unsuspecting people unlucky enough to have crossed his path and wronged him in some way. How can Lacy pursue him, without becoming the next name on his list?

Richard says…
As expected, this is a terrifically written tale. The plot may be a bit far fetched but as news stories continually demonstrate, there is no limit to how humans can surprise. So, someone being a serial killer for over 20 years…plausible. Don’t dismiss it. Humans are capable of just about anything.

The book is well written. One would expect nothing less from Grisham. It engages the reader with a polished storyline from the first pages right to the nice ending.

Well written, entertaining and engaging. Worth reading…well, if you like Grisham’s style of writing and enjoy legal dramas, yes!

 

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